Archery (Women) team event is on July 29, and that may be India's first realistic Gold prospect. Deepika Kumari is ranked #1 in the world. So chances of individual Gold are stronger than a team Gold, but for that you will have to wait till August 2.

I agree with the Anon user that registering a double digit Gold medal is an unrealistic expectation, but expect this to be India's best ever Olympics both in terms of Gold and total medal tally.

Some events where I am hopeful:

  • Archery
  • Tennis (At least mixed Doubles)
  • Badminton
  • Boxing
  • Wrestling
  • Shooting

I hope Hockey team manages to surprise by getting a Bronze, but that may be being a bit over-optimisitic.

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I am a tech-geek, who would happily pay 99 cents (Sometimes even more) for an app that I like, or sometimes even to try a cool idea. But most of the times, even I think twice whether I really need an app if I have to pay for it. And i know many of my friends, who would not buy any app, unless they are totally convinced that they need it.

Here are some things that may be affecting consumers' behavior:

  • Anchoring: People are used to have free apps, but not free desserts. An on-the-house dessert at a restaurant always feels like a generous offer. But keep this offer on for about 25 days, and on 26th day, you will hardly find any customers ordering desserts. You have anchored them into believing that desserts should be complimentary with the dinner.
    Similarly, a good number of apps are free, and this has anchored consumers to believe that apps should be free. I find it funny when I see adjectives like "greedy", "not cool" and "unfair" being used in reviews and forum-discussions for app-makers, who try to monetize the efforts that they have put into their app. 🙂
  • Problem of plenty: Gone are the days of "There's an app for that!". Today, it is "There are (many) apps for that!" For free apps, most users won't mind if they have multiple apps serving similar purposes on their smartphone (Example: I have both Shazam and SoundHound). But between multiple paid apps serving the same purpose, the users sometimes need to put some thought to decide which one would you buy. And a good number of times, the comparison never completes, and the purchase never happens!
  • Possibility of substitution:A dessert is a dessert, and perhaps can be substituted only by another dessert. Not so with apps. There are lots of substitution options available. Other apps on the same phone or sometimes their PC equivalents too! For example: Do I really need to pay $1.99 for "Craigslist mobile" for my iPhone when I know that I hunt for rental apartments only in the night, when I can search for it on my PC? And if it is really needed, I can simply go to my iPhone browser and search the listings.
  • Consumption pattern: If you pay $8 for a dessert, you consume it right then: all of it! Now, take out your iPhone and start going through the apps (Both free and paid) that you have used more than 5 times. I bet less than one-third of your apps would fall under this category. This guilt trap of having purchased some apps in past, but never using it, may deter users from spending another dollar for another app, which they know would perhaps never be used beyond the first 2-3 days.
  • Lack of knowledge about legal sharing: This will perhaps affect very few of the users, but the perceived value of an app may increase, and hence, the number of purchases may increase, if people are aware (And I know that many are not)that they can legally share the apps that they have purchased across different devices. Apple allows you to authorize up to five computers to share your iTunes purchases. I guess Android has similar conditions, as long as you are signing in with the same account.

Yes, many of the above would not look sensible (especially considering that we are talking about less than a dollar here) to a totally rational mind. But when it comes to consumers' reaction to pricing, you will always find irrational behavior. (On a totally different note, see this: http://m.theatlantic.com/busines…)

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I am a tech-geek, who would happily pay 99 cents (Sometimes even more) for an app that I like, or sometimes even to try a cool idea. But most of the times, even I think twice whether I really need an app if I have to pay for it. And i know many of my friends, who would not buy any app, unless they are totally convinced that they need it.

Here are some things that may be affecting consumers' behavior:

  • Anchoring: People are used to have free apps, but not free desserts. An on-the-house dessert at a restaurant always feels like a generous offer. But keep this offer on for about 25 days, and on 26th day, you will hardly find any customers ordering desserts. You have anchored them into believing that desserts should be complimentary with the dinner.
    Similarly, a good number of apps are free, and this has anchored consumers to believe that apps should be free. I find it funny when I see adjectives like "greedy", "not cool" and "unfair" being used in reviews and forum-discussions for app-makers, who try to monetize the efforts that they have put into their app. 🙂
  • Problem of plenty: Gone are the days of "There's an app for that!". Today, it is "There are (many) apps for that!" For free apps, most users won't mind if they have multiple apps serving similar purposes on their smartphone (Example: I have both Shazam and SoundHound). But between multiple paid apps serving the same purpose, the users sometimes need to put some thought to decide which one would you buy. And a good number of times, the comparison never completes, and the purchase never happens!
  • Possibility of substitution:A dessert is a dessert, and perhaps can be substituted only by another dessert. Not so with apps. There are lots of substitution options available. Other apps on the same phone or sometimes their PC equivalents too! For example: Do I really need to pay $1.99 for "Craigslist mobile" for my iPhone when I know that I hunt for rental apartments only in the night, when I can search for it on my PC? And if it is really needed, I can simply go to my iPhone browser and search the listings.
  • Consumption pattern: If you pay $8 for a dessert, you consume it right then: all of it! Now, take out your iPhone and start going through the apps (Both free and paid) that you have used more than 5 times. I bet less than one-third of your apps would fall under this category. This guilt trap of having purchased some apps in past, but never using it, may deter users from spending another dollar for another app, which they know would perhaps never be used beyond the first 2-3 days.
  • Lack of knowledge about legal sharing: This will perhaps affect very few of the users, but the perceived value of an app may increase, and hence, the number of purchases may increase, if people are aware (And I know that many are not)that they can legally share the apps that they have purchased across different devices. Apple allows you to authorize up to five computers to share your iTunes purchases. I guess Android has similar conditions, as long as you are signing in with the same account.

Yes, many of the above would not look sensible (especially considering that we are talking about less than a dollar here) to a totally rational mind. But when it comes to consumers' reaction to pricing, you will always find irrational behavior. (On a totally different note, see this: http://m.theatlantic.com/busines…)

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Amit Bhatnagar on Quora.com on July 11, 2012

This is infinite recursion!!

Try it out yourself: https://www.google.com/search?q=…

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amitbhatnagar on July 9, 2012

New York City. December, 2009: My NYC based friend had to pick me up from one of the metro stations, but I got down at the wrong side of the station. After about 3-4 calls of “Where exactly are you?” and 10 minutes of searching, we were able to find each other. At that time, I thought of an idea for an app that would allow two users to see each other’s location on a map, and this location would be updated regularly as the users move. I had just started using smartphones and was getting used to the idea of “There’s an app for that!”, but my friend instantly dismissed this idea as being too intrusive, to which I suggested that the app could allow users to share their location only for a specific period of time. We talked about this for another 2-3 minutes, and then, I completely forgot about it.

Months later, I got to know about Glympse and realized that when I was thinking about the idea, the app was already in business. It had everything that I had thought of in my idea, and more. (So, another business idea goes down the drain! 🙁 ) Since then, it has been one of my favorite and most frequently used apps.

Glympse uses your smartphone’s built-in GPS to locate your whereabouts, and then, it allows the recipient  to see your location using Google maps for a pre-defined period of time. As seen below, sending a Glypmse is really simple:

Send a Glympse

The only two mandatory details are: phone number/email of the recipient and the duration of the Glympse (default is 15 minutes). Message is optional, and so is destination. Usually, I fill in both these fields too, especially when the destination can be picked very easily from your last used destinations or your address-book.

Glympse in ActionOnce the recipient clicks the link in email/text message, he can view your location with real time updates. Typically, it is updated every 9-10 seconds. On right, you can see a screenshot of a Glympse that I recently sent to a friend. This is the view in the Glympse iPhone app, but the view in mobile browser or on a computer is not too different. As you can see, the view includes not only my location, but also my speed and estimated arrival time, if I have specified a destination. (No, I am not over-speeding here! I am in a BART train! 🙂 ). In the pic, the green line shows one of the possible paths from my current location to the final destination (perhaps the default path between two points as per Google maps), while the blue line indicates the route that I have taken since the start of this Glympse session. Of course, like usual Google maps view, you can zoom in or zoom out for the required level of details. One really good feature which I discovered  recently is how the app handles the change of destination. As a sender, you can “Modify” a Glympse and change the destination.  The recipient does not receive this as a separate message. Rather, at the next location update, the checkered flag indicating the endpoint is moved to the new destination.

There are so many use-cases I can think for this wonderful app . Here are some of them (most of which I have already tried!):

  1. Giving your family peace of mind when traveling at night: One of my most common uses of the app. When for any reason I am a bit late to get back home, I send my wife a Glympse while coming back. Being able to track me is very reassuring to her. And if unfortunately, anything bad does happen, she would immediately know the last good location before I stopped or was made to change directions.
  2. Meeting a friend in crowded public place: Especially, when things are too noisy for a phone call, sending a Glympse may work just right! (I used this while meeting my cousin at 4th of July fireworks in SF)
  3. Allow others to catch up at the right place when your plans are dynamic: You are in a new city for a day, and your friend plans to join you some time in next one hour. Problem is that you yourself are driving around, and don’t exactly know where you will be when your friend is free. Send your friend a Glympse, and he can join you wherever you are!
  4. Avoiding “Where are you” calls when you are late: Instead of 10 “I am almost there” calls (9 of which are lies!!), simply send your friends a Glympse and let them know when you’ll join them.
  5. Letting friends track you in a marathon, a bike-race or a long drive: This idea came from a friend, who loves to bike and often checks in on Foursquare/Facebook while on a bike-trail. He was really delighted to know about Glympse, as instead of checking in at individual locations, now, he can let his friends track his whole trail!

One of the best things about Glympse is that the recipient does not need to download the app to see the sender’s location. Because of this, it avoids the problem of Network effects that many emerging technologies face. Many of these are excellent ideas, but they never really take off, because they are not very useful till a good number of people start using them. For example: think of the initial fax machines. Nobody bought them as they had nobody to send faxes to! Once the fax-network crossed the critical mass, the sale of fax-machines skyrocketed! Unfortunately, many good ideas die without ever crossing that chasm. Glympse avoids this problem by freeing the recipient from the hassle of downloading another app he hasn’t heard of. As long as he is connected to the Internet through a phone/ tablet/ computer, the sender’s location can be tracked in a web-browser (although there is an option of using the app, if you are on a smartphone). Most of the time, recipients of my glympses love the way they are able to track my location and end up getting the app. (It’s free!)

There is just one downside of this awesome app: It’s a battery hog: both on the sender and receiver side! So unless you carry a car charger for your phone, you may not want to use this for long duration. This is understandable, as the app regularly needs to send/receive the current location of the sender. Again, this is not unique to Glympse, but a problem that is common to a number of Location Based Services. So, Glympse is no more a battery hog than Google Maps is.

Some features I would love to see added to future releases:

  • Ability to change location update frequency: While it is fun to see real time updates, the utility part of getting updates every few seconds is debatable, and if my phone is running low on battery, I may want to control the update frequency.  For most situations, an update every 1-2 minutes would be perfectly okay. For longer trips (Anything more than 2 hour) even an update every 5-10 minutes would serve the purpose. This should result in a big drop in battery consumption. Of course, this will almost kill the fun part of the app, but will still maintain the utility aspects. Another option maybe to provide users an option of selecting an “Intelligent mode”, where the update frequency would vary inversely with the remaining duration of the journey: At the start of a 4 hour trip, updates may be sent every 10 minutes, changing to 5 minutes in last 2 hours and finally switching to default real time updates in last 30 minutes!)
  • Trip recorder: Yes, the link provided to a recipient should expire after a specified time, but how about allowing the user to send  oneself and save a Glympse of his own location? There may be numerous use-cases for this: Allowing one to retrace his path for a lost wallet, embedding one’s completed bike-trail in a blog, or simply remembering an alternative route to a destination.

App-rating:*****

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Amit Bhatnagar on Quora.com on June 12, 2012

Everybody's darling since last 40+ years: The Amul girl! Here is what Wikipedia says about her:

Amul girl refers to the advertising mascot used by Amul, an Indian dairy brand. The Amul girl is a hand-drawn cartoon of a young, chubby Indian girl dressed in a polka dotted frock  with blue hair and a half pony tied up. The Amul girl advertising have often been described as one of the best Indian Advertising concepts because of their humour.

I used to like her when I was too young to understand the humor/satire. I liked her simply for her cute face and those "Utterly, butterly delicious" ads. Gradually, I started appreciating the humor and timeliness of the ads. Very often, you can see a billboard commenting on an event within 3-4 days of the actual date of the incident.

Although the Amul girl is strictly a business mascot, who appears on billboards and Amul Butter packets,  her status in India is comparable to that of regularly appearing newspaper cartoons. (next only to perhaps to RK Laxman's Common Man mentioned by Ankul Bagati. And while most daily cartoons focus primarily on Politics, Amul girl addresses a wider  topics, including but not limited to: Politics, Sports, Movies and Business. 

Some samples (You will need to know Hindi to cmpletely understand the puns)

After India's World Cup Cricket victory (The tagline is a play on Hindi for "Makes Impossible Possible" replacing the word for Possible (Honi) by the name of Indian Captain(Dhoni))

When Sensex (Bombay Stock Exchange's Stock index) was behaving erratically

After launch of Tata Nano, the unbelieveably affordable small car (The tagline is a play on Hindi for "Believe it or not")

And here are some for Amul girl's takes on Bollywood movies:

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Amit Bhatnagar on Quora.com on June 12, 2012

There is no option to un-filter. Since it's not clear from your question, whether you are asking from the perspective of a business-owner, review-writer or review-reader, I will cover all three:

However, as a review-writer whose review for a particular business has been filtered (I think you will have to log out to see whether your review has been filtered; your review is not filtered from you), you can do something about it. Build some credibility by writing more reviews, get more friends, do not copy-paste any reviews (not even your own!). You may want to read my answer here: How do the mechanics of Yelp's review filter work?

If you are an business-owner and your negative reviews are filtered, thank your stars, but go through each of those. There may be no legitimate reason for them getting filtered, except that the reviewer doesn't have much credibility yet.(see previous para) Unless you are sure that these reviews are from your jealous competitors, take all negative reviews (filtered or unfiltered) as a useful feedback, and try to incorporate that into your operations. However,if it's your 4* and 5* reviews that are filtered, you can't do much, except continuing to deliver good service, so that you get more such reviews!

As a review-reader, always pay attention to filtered reviews, especially for businesses with very few unfiltered reviews. (They will ask you to verify your human identity by filling in a re-CAPTCHA) Read them and use your judgement to see which ones feel right, but take them with a pinch of salt. Sometimes, there is a lot of useful information hidden in the filtered ones.

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Amit Bhatnagar on Quora.com on June 6, 2012

I know that very often restaurants and other businesses offer such a pathetic service that even a one star review looks too generous, but practically speaking, once you are used to the scale, it does not really really better what the high and low points are. Thinking of movies, I instantly know that a 4.5 is awesome on Netflix (5 point scale) and terrible on IMDB (10 point scale). Similarly, on Yelp, I know that a restaurant rated 1* is as low as it can get, even though the rating is not actually zero!

While from a viewpoint of a review-reader the choice of lowest rating point makes no difference, think of it from the perspective of a review-writer. How would you plan implementing a zero star rating? Currently, Yelp asks you to both write a review and pick a star-rating. So, an obvious solution for submitting a zero-star reviews is to post the review without selecting any stars.

But think of the inadvertent mistakes where after writing a raving review, a user forgets to select the star rating! (and believe me such mistakes will happen!) So, the restaurant gets the lowest rating, while the user in fact wanted to give them the highest! This may prove to be disastrous, as many Yelpers (me included) start with the average rating of a business. Only if that is reasonable (3.5 or higher), then, I proceed to read the reviews. I know an easy solution to this problem is to ask the user with a popup  if he really wants to post a 0 star review, but as discussed in first  part of this answer, the additional implementation effort may not be  worth it. Instead, Yelp safeguards against this problem by forcing you to pick a non-zero rating before you are able to submit a review!

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Amit Bhatnagar on Quora.com on June 3, 2012

Since I know that LinkedIn co-founder  Reid Garrett Hoffman is on Quora (I have read some answers by him), my first guess was that perhaps he may be the oldest LinkedIn member here. But when I checked his LinkedIn profile, i found that his ID is 1213, not #1 or #2.

So even before we know who is the oldest LinkedIn member on Quora, we need to know who were the first LinkedIn users, and then, we could check which of them are present on Quora.

A check for LinkedIn ID #1 or #2 leads to a page like the screenshot below. Most probably, these are all dummy users that were created while the initial tests were being conducted for LinkedIn as a service:

Of course, I could not have manually checked all the profile IDs till 1213 (i.e. Reid Hoffman's ID). So I used excel to fetch page title for LinkedIn profiles of first 1250 LinkedIn IDs. You may see that for a non-existent profile (like the one in screenshot above) the page title is "Profile|LinkedIn", and for real users with public profiles, the page title is in format of "<User Name>|LinkedIn" (Example: "Amit Bhatnagar|LinkedIn")

So, after my spreadsheet fetched me this list, it was just a matter of seeing first profile IDs with real names instead of "Profile|LinkedIn" Results can be seen in the screenshot below:

So, first 1209 users are all dummy users, and as expected, the first real LinkedIn users are all from founding team. First three are: Jean-Luc Vaillant, Eric Ly and  Lee Hower. And as you can guess from the tags, I could not locate Jean-Luc Vaillant on Quora. So the answer to your question is: Eric Ly

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Amit Bhatnagar on Quora.com on June 2, 2012

You can consider doing a search by location, but here is an old, neat trick to know the approximate number of people in any geographic area/profession: Use "Advertise with LinkedIn" and proceed with geographic segmentation.

I tried this out, and the result comes out to be a little over 2.5 MM. (See screenshot below)

If you reach this screen, scroll down to select job titles and then, start selecting different job functions. You will see the numbers for each job function. Some prominent functions:

  • Consulting: 77.5K
  • Marketing 77.8 K
  • Legal 49.6 K
  • Finance 85K
  • Engineering 209 K (Is anyone surprised?)
  • Entrepreneurship 217.6 K (For this one, even I am surprised, but perhaps, only in Bay Area, Entrepreneurship can be a leading job function!!)

Hope this helps!

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